If You’re in Sales Should You Use a Wireless Headset?

The headset has long been an iconic symbol of the call centre and the office sales floor. Thanks to digital technology, the device has evolved way beyond its original usage by telephone switchboard operators way back in the post-WWII period. Nowadays, they are almost ubiquitous in business, with travelling reps and senior management regularly seen sporting one of the less obtrusive buds in their ears, or as the hands-free option in company cars. But more and more businesses are opting for the wireless headset. Why is this? And how can they make a real difference to sales?

Wireless communication
Credit: IAN HOOTON/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

It’s all about the efficiency
Generally speaking all headsets share the same major advantage – the hands-free advantage. When a worker has both hands free during sales or inquiry calls, they can type sales orders and bring up product information far more readily and quickly, greatly increasing their productivity. A wireless headset builds on this increased efficiency by removing those pesky wires, which are prone to clattering over the keyboard while you’re trying to type or getting wound round your coffee cup when you’re deep in the middle of something important.

Fidelity you can believe in
Add to this the fact that wireless headsets, using the very latest in Digital Enhanced Cordless Telecommunications (DECT) technology are both more affordable and deliver the best sounding audio than ever before – in terms of both audio fidelity and noise cancelling – then it’s really no contest.

The benefits of wireless headset technology are so clear and obvious that everyone’s wanting a piece of the action, as demonstrated by Apple’s latest patent application published by the US Patent and Trademark Office last week, for a “hybrid” device combining the freedom of wireless headsets with the sound quality of traditional iPhone and iPod headphones. Apple knows wired headsets can get tangled – especially if you’re really getting down to your iTunes – but has previously claimed Bluetooth technology is inadequate for music reproduction. This new device aims to change all that, and bring the advantages of wireless headsets out of the office and on to the streets.

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